Shorebird Giclees for Sale as Part of Lake Timicau Restoration Auction

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As part of the Lake Timicau restoration project, we have been focusing on shorebirds on Dewees Island.  We had a photography art show where several artists submitted their works, and Diane Kliros turned those into beautiful paintings which can be purchased printed on canvas: great for any beach house or area near the beach.  Shorebirds are on track to become extinct in our lifetime, which is why we have embarked on our Lake Timicau restoration project as a way to improve feeding, nesting, and resting areas for shorebirds.  In 2018, we became part of the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network.

The original paintings were a labor of love for artist and Dewees Island resident Diane Kliros. As part of the Dewees Island Conservancy’s effort to bring awareness to some of our imperiled species, 7 photographers contributed time and talent to an exhibit celebrating the shorebirds that grace our shores. Many of these fragile visitors are on track for extinction within our lifetime.  Many travel thousands of miles between their wintering grounds near us and their breeding habitat in the arctic. From each photographer’s work, Diane created these lovely paintings. Limited edition prints and cards are being sold to help fund the restoration project that will provide feeding, resting, and breeding areas for threatened species on Dewees Island along the Atlantic Flyway.

Your donation helps us create the vital habitat these birds need. For more information or to donate, go to deweesislandconservancy.org. These are photos of the prints: actual prints are lovely on Canvas.

Whimbrel 18 x 24
  • Whimbrel, Numenius phaeopus can be found in winter or during migration on Dewees Island in small flocks in the marsh and Lake Timicau.  They are recognizable for their long decurved bills, which make it easy for them to probe the burrows of fiddler crabs. Photo by Pam Ford.
Greater Yellowlegs 16 x 12
  • Greater Yellowlegs, Tringa melanoleuca are often seen in the impoundment in the winter.  Their alarm calls, sounding like “kew kew kew”, can be heard as they flush when the eagle or other predator flies nearby. From a photo by Bubber McAlhany.  Click here to order prints.

    Lesser Yellowlegs 16 x 20

 

  • Lesser Yellowlegs, Tringa flavipes, are winter residents recognized by their slender body shape and bright yellow legs.  They are very active feeding in the shallows, looking for invertebrates and larval insects. From a photo by Judy Drew Fairchild.  Click here to order.
Dunlin 12 x 12
  • Dunlin, Calidris alpina, spend the winters along our shell middens and marshes, and nest in the arctic tundra.  They have slightly decurved bills and small stour bodies. They fly in rapidly shifting flocks along the Dewees Island ferry route in winter. From a photo by Ed Konrad.  Click here to order.
Black-bellied Plover 16 x 20
  • Black-bellied Plover, Pluvialis squatarola is a larger shorebird with a heavy short black bill.  We normally see them in winter plumage, but their breeding plumage is a striking mix of a stark black belly and face with a pale hood.  From a photo by Craig Watson. Click here to order.
Red Knot 16 x 20

Red Knots, Calidris cantus, migrate thousands of miles to breed in the arctic circle and winter in South America.  They stop at Dewees to fuel up for the journey.  From a photo by Allen Mitchell. Click here to order.

Sanderling 12 x 12

Sanderlings are the tiny shorebirds that run and feed along the edges of the waves on the shore. From a photo by Jane Faircloth.  Click here to order.

These look great as a collection or as stand-alone work.  Please allow 3-6 weeks for delivery.